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in afghanistan about the taliban and after that i was here in boston visiting jenna. we went shopping and delays and the cosmetic counter in the department store and came up and said thank you so much for speaking for women in afghanistan. that was really the first time that i thought, they heard me. -- in austin. i think i knew the first lady had a podium, but i did not really know until after that. >> c-span has this first of a kind project for television, examining the public and private lives of the women to serve as first lady. season one begins next monday president's day at 9:00 a.m. eastern and pacific on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> "washington journal" continues. host: on mondays we take a look at your money, how taxpayer dollars are being spent. our focus today is rebuilding afghanistan. john sopko is our guest. he's the special inspector general for afghanistan reconstruction. we were just talking about you have your own acronym in washington, that's important. the price tag so far for rebuilding afghanistan, $87 billion. what is your role in overseeing that money? guest:
at the bottom of three steep mountains woke up to an overwhelming attack by the taliban, very smart attack, up to 400 taliban fighters and it seemed impossible and i asked clint rome romechier on monday who is going to be award the the medal of honor, what it was like to face these impossible odds. throughout all of this, did you ever think this is it? i'm not going to get out of here. >> it's like a fighter going into the boxing ring, you know, if you think you're going to lose before you even step into the ring, you've already lost. you're there to win, you're there to fight, you're there to, you know, your brothers to your left and right are depending on you so you don't have that in you. >> when you talk about an overwhelming force describe to me what overwhelming is. >> it's the kind of thing where every time they opened a door to run out to deliver ammunition, a sniper would pick one of them off. there were five guys trapped in a humvee for hours, three men trapped in the mortar pit for hours. the first guy killed was running to a machine gun in the corner of the camp to return fire, kil
and music was banned for years by the taliban. now with help from the state department, the world bank and other supporters, these young afghan children are enjoying a rare moment of harmony. 13-year-old leila zhari has been waiting two years for this moment, the chance to perform on the world stage, while breaking another taliban taboo, girls and boys playing music together. which do you like better, the drums or the trumpet? which is more fun? >> the drums. >> reporter: the drums? she's one of 48 young musicians who attend the only music school in afghanistan. where music was strictly banned under taliban rule. many in the group are orphaned by war. some even lived on the streets. today they're nearly 7,000 miles from home, bringing traditional sound from their homeland. the tambor, meksed with western harmonies they're also learning. organizers hope the young musicians can learn about america and america can learn about afghanistan. music is making a comeback. >> the future of afghanistan, where the children of the country are, the future and that hope is not dead. >> reporter: how
, wolf. the taliban are taking credit for an attack on a police outpost in the eastern part of the country. gunman broke in during the night and killed 17 people, shooting them as they slept. ten officers are among the dead. the rest are friends and relatives, who happen to be spending the night in what they thought was a safe place. >>> and now to some business news and a big day on wall street. the dow jones industrials closed at a five-year high and a little under 90 points short of their all-time high. this was the second day of a big rally, sparked by good news from the housing market and upbeat talk from federal reserve chairman, ben bernanke. >>> and the classical music world is mourning today the death of a pianist whose playing brought communist and capitalists together. vann clyburn, a texan, was only 23 years old when he won an international competition in moscow back in 1958 during the height of the cold war. he's considered one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century. he developed bone cancer and died today in texas. he was 78 years old. but had a lot of pe
teenagers, generally want to stop at the time they're 30 and 20 taliban it's bad for them, you remind them of the fact that they couldn't control their own destiny so they get anxious, and what did they do? facebook. it's a coping mechanism. we get a large trial at colombia university sponsored by the nih. wanting as with which we can have depressed people in the trial. we had to cancel the trial but we couldn't find a single smoker who was not clinically depressed. the fundamental insight yet again is what to do to help these folks? i would argue that you take a couple different paths. one is show them what's happening. this is what a smoker's lung looks like. you can't hide from the. just look at the darn thing. at 11:00 you see that? as emphysema. the dark tar deposits is pretty evident as well from the cigarettes. and when you see that you have awareness and understanding why this matters to you. but the second insight you have, we offer is there certain times you can change people's minds. as a heart surgeon i don't have a lot of control of people who come in for surgery. i've done my
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)